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TERMS OF USE FOR LEAN IN GIRLS CURRICULUM

Your use of the Lean In Girls curriculum and any other materials that the Sandberg Goldberg Bernthal Family Foundation and its subsidiaries and affiliates including LeanIn.Org, LLC, and Lean In Girls, LLC (“SGB”) may make available to you on or through this website, including all related intellectual property and other proprietary rights of any kind (the “LIG Materials”) is subject to the terms below (the “LIG Terms”), in addition to the general terms available at leanin.org/terms (the “Terms of Service”). Capitalized terms used in these LIG Terms that are not otherwise defined have the meaning set forth in the Terms of Service. All of the provisions in the Terms of Service apply to the LIG Materials and are incorporated herein by reference. In the event of a conflict between the provisions in these LIG Terms and the Terms of Service, the provisions in these LIG Terms will control, but only with respect to the LIG Materials and not with respect to any other portion of Our Content. 


1. Use of the LIG Materials

1.1.  Ownership. You acknowledge that we own all right, title, and interest in and to the LIG Materials. Other than the rights granted in the Terms of Service and these LIG Terms, you have no right, title, or interest in or to the LIG Materials and we hereby expressly reserve all rights that are not granted under such terms.

1.2.  Use Rights. Subject to your compliance with these LIG Terms and the Terms of Service, including the use restrictions set forth in the Terms of Service, you may use the LIG Materials solely in furtherance of Lean In Girls’ mission of empowering girls, celebrating them as leaders, and inspiring them to lead boldly (the “LIG Mission”). You agree that you will use the LIG Materials solely for your personal, non-commercial purposes, and that you will not give any third party, whether directly or indirectly, access to the LIG Materials. The LIG Materials are not designed for people who want to create and sell courses and may not be sold or used to promote any particular service or product.


1.3. Additional Use Restrictions. In addition to the restrictions set forth in the Terms of Service, you acknowledge and agree that you will not, and will not permit others to, use the LIG Materials: (a) for any commercial or for-profit purpose, including selling or promoting any products or services; (b) in any manner that suggests that you are acting for or on behalf of SGB; (c) in any advertising, publicity releases, or promotional or marketing publications, or correspondence to third-party news sources or outlets without, in each case, securing SGB’s prior written consent; or (d) in any schools, educational institutions, or other facilities, unless you have secured all necessary consents, authorizations, or other approvals. You further agree that you will not, and will not permit others to, make any material alterations, modifications, or other changes, without SGB’s prior written consent, to any name, logo, trademark, or other proprietary indicia (including the SGB Trademarks) present on or appearing in the LIG Materials. You may not incorporate any materials or intellectual property owned by a third party into the LIG Materials without first obtaining the proper consent of the applicable third party. SGB will not be responsible for your use of any third party’s intellectual property or other proprietary rights in connection with the LIG Materials.

2. Registration

In order to download, use, and access the LIG Materials, you must provide certain information to SGB, including your name and email address. For more information on how we process data, and other information that you may provide to us or that we may otherwise collect, please see Section 3 of the Terms of Service and visit our Lean In Girls Privacy Policy.

3. Safety and Well-Being

You understand that, while using the LIG Materials, some users or participants in your programs may reach out to you with concerns about their safety or well-being or someone else’s safety or well-being. Your legal and ethical responsibilities will differ depending on a number of factors, including whether you are employed by a school or other organization, if you are performing as a volunteer, your professional responsibilities, and the state in which you reside. It is your responsibility to make sure that you are familiar with all responsibilities, including your organization’s policies and procedures and any applicable federal, state, or local laws, rules, or regulations. You understand that your use of the LIG Materials does not make you an employee or agent of SGB, and that you will not hold yourself out as such.

4. Not Legal Advice

The LIG Materials are provided for general information purposes only, on an “AS IS” basis, are not legal advice, and do not constitute any interpretation of any organizational policy or procedure, or any law, rule, or regulation. You may use the LIG Materials and any information or guidance included in the LIG Materials only in connection with the LIG Mission and according to these LIG Terms and the Terms of Service. You must not use or permit others to use the LIG Materials or any information or other guidance included in the LIG Materials, for any other purpose.

5. Warranty Disclaimer

PLEASE BE AWARE THAT PROFESSIONAL OPINIONS, INDUSTRY BEST PRACTICES, AND GENERALLY ACCEPTED GUIDELINES MAY VARY GEOGRAPHICALLY AND MAY CHANGE OVER TIME.  AS A RESULT, THE LIG MATERIALS MAY NOT BE ACCURATE OR REFLECT BEST PRACTICES FOR A SPECIFIC COMMUNITY OR AT ANY GIVEN TIME. WHILE EFFORTS HAVE BEEN MADE TO ENSURE THE INTEGRITY OF THE LIG MATERIALS, SGB, LEANIN.ORG, LLC AND LEAN IN GIRLS, LLC GIVE NO, AND HEREBY DISCLAIM ALL, REPRESENTATIONS, WARRANTIES, COVENANTS, OR OTHER GUARANTEES WITH RESPECT TO THE LIG MATERIALS, WHETHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING THE WARRANTIES OF TITLE, QUALITY, ACCURACY, RELIABILITY, NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY, AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE


6. Damages Disclaimer

SGB WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE OR LIABLE FOR ANY LOSS OR DAMAGE ARISING OUT OF OR RELATING TO ANY ERROR, OMISSION, OR INACCURACY INCLUDED WITHIN, OR THE RELIABILITY OF, THE LIG MATERIALS, OR FOR YOUR OR ANY THIRD PARTY’S USE OR INTERPRETATION OF, OR RELIANCE ON, THE LIG MATERIALS.

7.  Emergencies

IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY RELATED TO YOUR USE OF THE LIG MATERIALS, DO NOT CONTACT SGB. IN SUCH SITUATIONS, YOU ARE SOLELY RESPONSIBLE FOR FOLLOWING ANY LAWS, RULES, OR REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO YOU, INCLUDING ANY ORGANIZATIONAL POLICIES OR PROCEDURES. 

8. Termination

SGB reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to restrict, suspend, or terminate your access to and use of the LIG Materials at any time, with or without prior notice, and to seek any remedies available to it at law, in equity, or under the Terms of Service.

Let’s clear a path for girls

Explore our curriculum

Empowering girls starts with us

There are steps each of us can take to positively impact how girls see themselves and their possibilities. When adults challenge stereotypes and provide girls with opportunities to build new skills, girls are more likely to see themselves as leaders.1 And the girl who speaks up and leads her way becomes the woman with the boldness and resilience to achieve her dreams—and change the world.

Tip 1

GET REAL WITH GIRLS

Did you know:

The world is still stacked against girls, but this is rarely discussed. On top of this, the “girl power” narrative leads many girls to believe that gender inequality is a thing of the past.2 This leads girls to blame themselves when they face bias and barriers—and to internalize harmful stereotypes about what girls can and can't do.3 That’s why it’s so important we address these issues head on: it can be an antidote to girls blaming themselves and can help promote their self-esteem.4

What you can do:

We need to get real with girls, early and often. This means surfacing the unfair messages and systems around us and speaking up when you see bias in action.5 If girls are judged for their appearance or overlooked for a leadership role, unpack the stereotypes behind these experiences. And when a girl expresses sadness or frustration for being treated unfairly, validate her feelings and explain that it is not a reflection of who she is or what she is capable of.

Read more tips and actions you can take
Explore

STRENGTH BUILDING + REAL TALK = GIRL POWER

With equal parts strength building and real talk on the bias and barriers girls face, our Lean In Girls curriculum teaches girls to embrace their leadership superpowers and reject limiting stereotypes about what girls can’t do. Teens who participate in the program tell us they discover more about themselves, learn there are lots of ways to lead, feel more confidence in their abilities, and build strong connections with each other. We provide everything to make it easy for you to run a session. Just add a group of girls and watch something magical happen.

how it works

Designed for girls and teens who identify with the girlhood experience

Rooted in research and developed in close collaboration with experts and teens

Tested to ensure it resonates with a broad range of girls and fosters sharing and connection

Each session includes an “ignite,” a fun info-packed activity, and a commitment to take action

We provide everything you need to get started—and always at no cost

Join our community

Join our “Raising Lean In Girls” group on Facebook to receive a regular dose of tips and inspiration from our team and other caregivers committed to raising empowered girls.

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Join one of our free facilitator workshops

In an hour, we’ll walk you through everything you need to lead a Lean In Girls session—and 100% of people who attend a training feel equipped to run the program!

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Footnotes

1

Marianne Bertrand, "Gender in the Twenty-First Century," AEA Papers and Proceedings 110 (2020).

2

Pamela Bettis, Nicole C. Ferry, and Mary Roe, “Lord of the Guys: Alpha Girls and the Post-Feminist Landscape of American Education,” Gender Issues 33, no. 2 (2016): 163–81, doi:10.1007/s12147-016-9153-x; Pamela J. Bettis and Nicole Ferry, “Discourses of Adolescence and Gender in the United States,” Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education (New York: Oxford University Press, 2018); Shauna Pomerantz, Rebecca Raby, and Andrea Stefanik, “Girls Run the World? Caught Between Sexism and Postfeminism in School,” Gender & Society 27, no. 2 (2013), doi:10.1177/0891243212473199.

3

Kingsley M. Schroeder and Lynn S. Liben, "Felt Pressure to Conform to Cultural Gender Roles: Correlates and Consequences," Sex Roles 84, nos. 3–4 (2021).

4

 Kingsley M. Schroeder and Lynn S. Liben, "Felt Pressure to Conform to Cultural Gender Roles: Correlates and Consequences," Sex Roles 84, nos. 3–4 (2021).

5

Amy Heberle, Luke J. Rapa, and Flora Farago, “Critical consciousness in children and adolescents: A systematic review, critical assessment, and recommendations for future research,” Psychological Bulletin 146 (2020).

6

Neil Dempster, Elizabeth Stevens, and Mary Keeffe, “Student and Youth Leadership: A Focused Literature Review,” Leading and Managing 17, no. 2 (2011): 1–20;  Jerusha Osberg Conner and Karen Strobel, “Leadership Development: An Examination of Individual and Programmatic Growth,” Journal of Adolescent Research 22, no. 3 (2007): 275–97, doi:10.1177/0743558407299698; Girl Scout Research Institute, “Change IT UP! What Girls Say About Redefining Leadership,” Girl Scout Research Institute (2008).

7

Christia Spears Brown and Ellen A. Stone, “Gender Stereotypes and Discrimination: How Sexism Impacts Development,” in Stacey S. Horn, Martin D. Ruck, and Lynn S. Liben, eds., Advances in Child Development and Behavior, vol. 50 (Cambridge, MA: Academic Press, 2016); Girl Scout Research Institute, “Change IT UP! What Girls Say About Redefining Leadership,” Girl Scout Research Institute (2008).

8

Christia Spears Brown, Sharla D. Biefeld, and Michelle J. Tam, Gender in Childhood, Elements in Child Development (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2020); Anne Fausto-Sterling, “A Dynamic Systems Framework for Gender/Sex Development: From Sensory Input in Infancy to Subjective Certainty in Toddlerhood,” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Cognitive Neuroscience Section 15 (2021), https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2021.613789/full; Kingsley M. Schroeder and Lynn S. Liben, "Felt Pressure to Conform to Cultural Gender Roles: Correlates and Consequences," Sex Roles 84, nos. 3–4 (2021). 

9

Mary Shapiro, Diane Grossman, et al., “Middle School Girls and the ‘Leaky Pipeline’ to Leadership,” Middle School Journal 46, no. 5 (2015); Tania L. King, Anna J. Scovelle, et al., “Gender Stereotypes and Biases in Early Childhood: A Systematic Review,” Australasian Journal of Early Childhood 46, no. 2 (2021).

10

Shelley J. Correll, "Constraints into Preferences: Gender, Status, and Emerging Career Aspirations," American Sociological Review 69, no. 1 (2004); Allison Master, "Gender Stereotypes Influence Children’s STEM Motivation," Child Development Perspectives 15, no. 3 (2021).

11

D. Dinkel and K. Snyder, “Exploring gender differences in infant motor development related to parent’s promotion of play,” Infant Behavior and Development 59 (2020), doi:10.1016/j.infbeh.2020.10144; S. Eisen, S. E. Matthews, and J. Jirout, “Parents’ and children’s gendered beliefs about toys and screen media,” Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 74, no. 101276 (2021), doi:10.1016/j.appdev.2021.101276; Tania King et al., “Gender stereotypes and biases in early childhood: A systematic review,” Australasian Journal of Early Childhood 46, no. 2 (2021).

12

Natasha Duell and Laurence Steinberg, “Adolescents take positive risks, too,” Developmental Review 62 (2021); Maria Olsson and Sarah E. Martiny, “Does Exposure to Counterstereotypical Role Models Influence Girls’ and Women’s Gender Stereotypes and Career Choices? A Review of Social Psychological Research,” Frontiers in Psychology, Personality and Social Psychology Section 9 (2018), https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02264/full; Albert Bandura et al., “Self-efficacy beliefs as shapers of children’s aspirations and career trajectories,” Child Development 72 (2001), https://www.scinapse.io/papers/2097934799.

13

Alyssa Croft et al., “The Second Shift Reflected in the Second Generation: Do Parents’ Gender Roles at Home Predict Children’s Aspirations?” Psychological Science 25, no. 7 (2014).

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